1.  
  2. Laura Letinsky, "Untitled #7," 2010, archival inkjet print. ©Laura Letinsky. Courtesy of the artist and Yancy Richardson Gallery.
    Laura Letinsky, Untitled #4, 2010, archival inkjet print. ©Laura Letinsky. Courtesy of the artist and Yancy Richardson Gallery, New York.
    Laura Letinsky, "Untitled #8," 2010, archival inkjet print. ©Laura Letinsky. Courtesy of the artist and Yancy Richardson Gallery, New York.
    Laura Letinsky, "Untitled #41," 2013, archival inkjet print. ©Laura Letinsky. Courtesy of the artist and Yancy Richardson Gallery, New York.
    Laura Letinsky, "Untitled #47," 2014, archival inkjet print. ©Laura Letinsky. Courtesy of the artist and Yancy Richardson Gallery, New York.
    Laura Letinsky, "Untitled #53," 2014, archival inkjet print. ©Laura Letinsky. Courtesy of the artist and Yancy Richardson Gallery, New York.
    Laura Letinsky, "Untitled #5," 2010, archival inkjet print. ©Laura Letinsky. Courtesy of the artist and Yancy Richardson Gallery, New York.
    Laura Letinsky, "Untitled #27," 2011, archival inkjet print. ©Laura Letinsky. Courtesy of the artist and Yancy Richardson Gallery, New York.

    the-adaa:

    PHOTOGRAPHER LAURA LETINSKY WRECKS THE TABLE IN HER NEW BOOK

    Laura Letinsky is best known for her ‘vanitas’ inspired still life photographs of dinner leftovers: wine-stained tabletops covered with decaying floral arrangements, half-devoured food, and dirty dinnerware in disarray. In her recent series, “Ill Form & Void Full,” the tables become even more undone as Letinsky recreates the detritus of dinner parties with the collapsing perspectives of Cubist collage. 

    This work is the subject of a new monograph published by Radius Books, concurrent with the exhibition “Yours, More Pretty,” at Yancey Richardson Gallery. Alongside an interview with the artist by the acclaimed writer Lynne Tillman and an essay by curator and critic Anthony ElmsIll Form & Void Full presents 47 of Letinsky’s montaged pictures. 

    In place of actual objects, Letinsky tailors fragmented cutouts of their reproductions from her own photographs, those of other artists such as Matisse and Richter, and advertisements from lifestyle magazines such as Martha Stewart Living and Good Housekeeping. Culled from popular culture and high art alike, the vivid scraps of paper are set against layered white backdrops, creating a two-dimensional house of mirrors that plays with our perception and reminds us how it plays with us.

    IMAGES FROM TOP: Laura Letinsky, Untitled #7, 2010, archival inkjet printLaura Letinsky, Untitled #4, 2010, archival inkjet printLaura Letinsky, Untitled #8, 2010, archival inkjet printLaura Letinsky, Untitled #41, 2013, archival inkjet printLaura Letinsky, Untitled #47, 2014, archival inkjet printLaura Letinsky, Untitled #53, 2014, archival inkjet print. Laura Letinsky, Untitled #5, 2010, archival inkjet printLaura Letinsky, Untitled #27, 2011, archival inkjet print©Laura Letinsky. Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York.

     
  3. davidnolangallery:

    White Magic: Robert Ryman, Rudolf Staffel is now on view through October 25.

    The exhibition brings together two masters – painter, Robert Ryman (b. Nashville, Tennessee, 1930) and ceramicist, Rudolf Staffel (b. San Antonio, Texas, 1911-2002) – who, within their respective media (each strictly reduced to a palette almost exclusively of white), achieve highly complex bodies of work that celebrate form and gesture. Alongside a group of paintings by Ryman, we will exhibit over 40 ceramic vessels created by Staffel from the 1950s through the early 1990s, making this the first major presentation of Staffel’s work in 16 years.


    Photo:
    Rudolf Staffel
    Light Gatherer
    translucent glazed porcelain, handbuilt, with copper oxide wash
    4 1/2 x 8 in

    (via the-adaa)

     

  4. Hey followers! Anyone interested in art, art galleries and interviews with dealers and artists themselves should check out the Art Dealers Association of America’s (ADAA) tumblr! 

     
  5.  
  6. lastlips:

    khadds:

    superselected:

    Hair-stories. New Works From Artist Nakeya B.

    MORE.

    I love this we work hard on our hair no matter natural braids weave anything we work hard and it’s creativity so dont mock or shame me

    I love this so much.

    (via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

     
  7. sfmoma:

    SubmissionFriday:

    Transference”

    intaglio

    18x24

    2014

    http://jimmyviera.com/home.html

     
  8. ryanpanos:

    Frameworks | Sam Laughlin

    Across Europe one finds buildings that lie unfinished, some are skeletal in form and purpose. These concrete forms represent a stage in architectural process that, in their case, may never be completed. Here we see architecture paused; construction has ceased and we are left with the bones of buildings in stasis.

    In this state, an architectural lineage is revealed by their resemblance to the remains of classical structures. Incomplete for economic and political reasons, they becomes runis of modernity.

    (via androphilia)

     
  9. Empire State Building (hier: Subway Station 33rd Street (6))

     
  10. Museum Walls #MoMA

     
  11. Gustav Klimt, “Hope, II,” 1907-08, oil, gold, and platinum on canvas. #MoMA #FreeFridays (hier: MoMA The Museum of Modern Art)

     
  12. Gustav Klimt, “Der Park,” c. 1910, oil on canvas #MoMA (hier: MoMA The Museum of Modern Art)

     
  13. Powerful and interesting show of #VisibleMan by @JLagarrigue @DriscollBabcock @the_adaa #visitthegalleries (hier: Chelsea Galleries)

     
  14. Moving installation by #DavidHockney @pacegallery @the_adaa #visitthegalleries (hier: Pace Gallery)

     
     
  15. #PaulGraham Does Yellow Run Forever @pacegallery @the_adaa #visitthegalleries (hier: Pace Gallery)